LORD WALTER, SLAYER OF MAN AND BEAST

LORD WALTER, SLAYER OF MAN AND BEAST


countdown to tiffany’s birthday:
    ↳ D-10 - Tiffany pra-debut.

countdown to tiffany’s birthday:
    ↳ D-10 - Tiffany pra-debut.

countdown to tiffany’s birthday:
    ↳ D-10 - Tiffany pra-debut.

countdown to tiffany’s birthday:
    ↳ D-10 - Tiffany pra-debut.

countdown to tiffany’s birthday:
    ↳ D-10 - Tiffany pra-debut.

countdown to tiffany’s birthday:
    ↳ D-10 - Tiffany pra-debut.

countdown to tiffany’s birthday:
    ↳ D-10 - Tiffany pra-debut.

countdown to tiffany’s birthday:
    ↳ D-10 - Tiffany pra-debut.

countdown to tiffany’s birthday:

    ↳ D-10 - Tiffany pra-debut.

(via stepihwang)

akatsukilo:

when I was like 11 and they banned Harry Potter and manga in school because people thought it was magic and propagating satanic magical shit I asked my nana why God hates magic if Jesus did magic and my nana was like “Jesus didn’t do magic, he performed miracles” and I was like “that’s a kind of magic” and she’s like “no thats the power of god he brought lazarus back to life” and was like “lmao bringing people back from the dead is like the most powerful magic” but yeah

Nigga, miracles and magic are the same shit. Your Grandma is frontin/didn’t read the item description on the Talisman of Beasts.

oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.
oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.
oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.
oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.
oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.
oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.
oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.
oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.
oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.
oakttree:

project-blackbird:


Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.
Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.
Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.
i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.

oakttree:

project-blackbird:

Emily Vancamp as Sharon Carter in “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”

Here’s an example of what we call a “soft no”. Sharon turns down Steve’s offer in a way that’s meant not to insult him but never actually uses the word “no”.

Steve clearly gets the message, though, and importantly offers to leave her alone. Sharon’s comment afterwards gives him an opportunity to try again later, but he doesn’t press and respects her rejection of his company even though it’s probably hurt his feelings a bit.

Just in case you ever wonder “What would Captain America do?”; there you go.

i also thought this was interesting because it reveals something about the subtleties of sharon’s job as an espionage agent, the particular social skills she needs. she has to keep steve close, so that she can keep an eye on and protect him, so when she unexpectedly comes into contact with him, she takes the opportunity to make friendly, just-this-side-of-flirtatious conversation. of course, regardless of whether she’d be interested in seeing him socially or romantically (and i don’t think the movie gives us any real clues as to whether she is or not; sharon’s not quite the cipher natasha is, but she has a pretty good poker face), she know that she can’t pursue it, because it would be a conflict of interest in terms of her job as a spy. and she deals with the situation with a great deal of finesse.

i thought it was pretty impressive on a number of levels.

(via captainofalltheships)

largeleader:

Weird Al Yankovic, everyone…

largeleader:

Weird Al Yankovic, everyone…

(via theladyblaze)

michigrim:

The Matrix (1999) Directed by Andy and Lana Wachowskicompared withGhost in the Shell Stand Alone Complex 2nd Gig Episode 4 “NATURAL ENEMY” (2004) Production I.G.
It’s well known that Ghost in the Shell had a huge influence on The Matrix I have taken the following info from the wikipedia page for the series as it sums it up better than I can at the current moment.
Japanese director Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell was a strong influence.[19] Producer Joel Silver has stated that the Wachowskis first described their intentions for The Matrix by showing him that anime and saying, “We wanna do that for real”.[20][21]Mitsuhisa Ishikawa of Production I.G, which produced Ghost in the Shell, noted that the anime’s high-quality visuals were a strong source of inspiration for the Wachowskis. He also commented, “… cyberpunk films are very difficult to describe to a third person. I’d imagine that The Matrix is the kind of film that was very difficult to draw up a written proposal for to take to film studios.” He stated that since Ghost in the Shell had gained recognition in America, the Wachowskis used it as a “promotional tool”.[22]
It’s rather interesting that influences came full circle during the production of 2nd Gig.
michigrim:

The Matrix (1999) Directed by Andy and Lana Wachowskicompared withGhost in the Shell Stand Alone Complex 2nd Gig Episode 4 “NATURAL ENEMY” (2004) Production I.G.
It’s well known that Ghost in the Shell had a huge influence on The Matrix I have taken the following info from the wikipedia page for the series as it sums it up better than I can at the current moment.
Japanese director Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell was a strong influence.[19] Producer Joel Silver has stated that the Wachowskis first described their intentions for The Matrix by showing him that anime and saying, “We wanna do that for real”.[20][21]Mitsuhisa Ishikawa of Production I.G, which produced Ghost in the Shell, noted that the anime’s high-quality visuals were a strong source of inspiration for the Wachowskis. He also commented, “… cyberpunk films are very difficult to describe to a third person. I’d imagine that The Matrix is the kind of film that was very difficult to draw up a written proposal for to take to film studios.” He stated that since Ghost in the Shell had gained recognition in America, the Wachowskis used it as a “promotional tool”.[22]
It’s rather interesting that influences came full circle during the production of 2nd Gig.
michigrim:

The Matrix (1999) Directed by Andy and Lana Wachowskicompared withGhost in the Shell Stand Alone Complex 2nd Gig Episode 4 “NATURAL ENEMY” (2004) Production I.G.
It’s well known that Ghost in the Shell had a huge influence on The Matrix I have taken the following info from the wikipedia page for the series as it sums it up better than I can at the current moment.
Japanese director Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell was a strong influence.[19] Producer Joel Silver has stated that the Wachowskis first described their intentions for The Matrix by showing him that anime and saying, “We wanna do that for real”.[20][21]Mitsuhisa Ishikawa of Production I.G, which produced Ghost in the Shell, noted that the anime’s high-quality visuals were a strong source of inspiration for the Wachowskis. He also commented, “… cyberpunk films are very difficult to describe to a third person. I’d imagine that The Matrix is the kind of film that was very difficult to draw up a written proposal for to take to film studios.” He stated that since Ghost in the Shell had gained recognition in America, the Wachowskis used it as a “promotional tool”.[22]
It’s rather interesting that influences came full circle during the production of 2nd Gig.

michigrim:

The Matrix (1999) Directed by Andy and Lana Wachowski
compared with
Ghost in the Shell Stand Alone Complex 2nd Gig Episode 4 “NATURAL ENEMY” (2004) Production I.G.

It’s well known that Ghost in the Shell had a huge influence on The Matrix
I have taken the following info from the wikipedia page for the series as it sums it up better than I can at the current moment.


Japanese director Mamoru Oshii’s Ghost in the Shell was a strong influence.[19] Producer Joel Silver has stated that the Wachowskis first described their intentions for The Matrix by showing him that anime and saying, “We wanna do that for real”.[20][21]Mitsuhisa Ishikawa of Production I.G, which produced Ghost in the Shell, noted that the anime’s high-quality visuals were a strong source of inspiration for the Wachowskis. He also commented, “… cyberpunk films are very difficult to describe to a third person. I’d imagine that The Matrix is the kind of film that was very difficult to draw up a written proposal for to take to film studios.” He stated that since Ghost in the Shell had gained recognition in America, the Wachowskis used it as a “promotional tool”.[22]

It’s rather interesting that influences came full circle during the production of 2nd Gig.

(via fuckyeahanimescenery)

deansdamnation:

thespyandthesoldier:

weight-a-second:

me too, Arya, me tooooo

This whole scene is golden.

you could hear arya going through puberty
deansdamnation:

thespyandthesoldier:

weight-a-second:

me too, Arya, me tooooo

This whole scene is golden.

you could hear arya going through puberty
deansdamnation:

thespyandthesoldier:

weight-a-second:

me too, Arya, me tooooo

This whole scene is golden.

you could hear arya going through puberty
deansdamnation:

thespyandthesoldier:

weight-a-second:

me too, Arya, me tooooo

This whole scene is golden.

you could hear arya going through puberty
deansdamnation:

thespyandthesoldier:

weight-a-second:

me too, Arya, me tooooo

This whole scene is golden.

you could hear arya going through puberty
deansdamnation:

thespyandthesoldier:

weight-a-second:

me too, Arya, me tooooo

This whole scene is golden.

you could hear arya going through puberty

deansdamnation:

thespyandthesoldier:

weight-a-second:

me too, Arya, me tooooo

This whole scene is golden.

you could hear arya going through puberty

(via pinuppussycat)